NAME

bdep-common-options – details on common options

SYNOPSIS

bdep [common-options] ...

DESCRIPTION

The common options control behavior that is common to all or most of the bdep commands. They can be specified either before the command or after, together with the command-specific options.

COMMON OPTIONS

-v
Print essential underlying commands being executed. This is equivalent to --verbose 2.
-V
Print all underlying commands being executed. This is equivalent to --verbose 3.
--quiet|-q
Run quietly, only printing error messages. This is equivalent to --verbose 0.
--verbose level
Set the diagnostics verbosity to level between 0 and 6. Level 0 disables any non-error messages while level 6 produces lots of information, with level 1 being the default. The following additional types of diagnostics are produced at each level:
  1. High-level information messages.
  2. Essential underlying commands being executed.
  3. All underlying commands being executed.
  4. Information that could be helpful to the user.
  5. Information that could be helpful to the developer.
  6. Even more detailed information.
--jobs|-j num
Number of jobs to perform in parallel. If this option is not specified or specified with the 0 value, then the number of available hardware threads is used. This option is also propagated when executing package manager commands such as bpkg-pkg-update(1), bpkg-pkg-test(1), etc., which in turn propagate it to the build system.
--no-progress
Suppress progress indicators for long-lasting operations, such as network transfers, building, etc.
--bpkg path
The package manager program to be used for build configuration management. This should be the path to the bpkg executable. You can also specify additional options that should be passed to the package manager program with --bpkg-option.

If the package manager program is not explicitly specified, then bdep will by default use bpkg plus an executable suffix if one was specified when building bdep. So, for example, if bdep name was set to bdep-1.0, then it will look for bpkg-1.0.

--bpkg-option opt
Additional option to be passed to the package manager program. See --bpkg for more information on the package manager program. Repeat this option to specify multiple package manager options.
--build path
The build program to be used to build packages. This should be the path to the build2 b executable. You can also specify additional options that should be passed to the build program with --build-option.

If the build program is not explicitly specified, then bdep will by default use b plus an executable suffix if one was specified when building bdep. So, for example, if bdep name was set to bdep-1.0, then it will look for b-1.0.

--build-option opt
Additional option to be passed to the build program. See --build for more information on the build program. Repeat this option to specify multiple build options.
--curl path
The curl program to be used for network operations. You can also specify additional options that should be passed to the curl program with --curl-option.

If the curl program is not explicitly specified, then bdep will use curl by default.

--curl-option opt
Additional option to be passed to the curl program. See --curl for more information on the curl program. Repeat this option to specify multiple curl options.
--pager path
The pager program to be used to show long text. Commonly used pager programs are less and more. You can also specify additional options that should be passed to the pager program with --pager-option. If an empty string is specified as the pager program, then no pager will be used. If the pager program is not explicitly specified, then bdep will try to use less. If it is not available, then no pager will be used.
--pager-option opt
Additional option to be passed to the pager program. See --pager for more information on the pager program. Repeat this option to specify multiple pager options.
--options-file file
Read additional options from file. Each option should appearing on a separate line optionally followed by space and an option value. Empty lines and lines starting with # are ignored. Option values can be enclosed in double (") or single (') quotes to preserve leading and trailing whitespaces as well as to specify empty values. If the value itself contains trailing or leading quotes, enclose it with an extra pair of quotes, for example '"x"'. Non-leading and non-trailing quotes are interpreted as being part of the option value.

The semantics of providing options in a file is equivalent to providing the same set of options in the same order on the command line at the point where the --options-file option is specified except that the shell escaping and quoting is not required. You can repeat this option to specify more than one options file.

BUGS

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